calimero
Hello Guest! Please sign in or register!

  • The future of the eurozone 5 1
Currently:  

Poll

In the beginning of 2015 Lithuania will become the 19th member of the eurozone. How do you expect the number of eurozone members to develop in the following 10 years until the year 2025?

There will be more than 19 eurozone member states in 2025.
23 (79.3%)
There will still be 19 eurozone member states.
1 (3.4%)
There will be less than 19 eurozone member states in 10 years.
1 (3.4%)
The euro won't exist any more.
4 (13.8%)

Total Members Voted: 15

Voting closed: December 24, 2014, 16:36

Author Topic: The future of the eurozone  (Read 60401 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

coffejohn

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 251
  • -Received: 659
  • Posts: 1518
  • Country: 00
  • John Hawkins, retired canal boat builder.
Re: Trump’s EU ambassador hints euro 'could FAIL' in 18 month
« Reply #405 on: January 26, 2017, 21:09 »
What do you think about the comments of Trumps new EU ambassador?

<object width="640" height="385"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/tzM5Ar55KPE&fs=1&start="></param> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param> <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/tzM5Ar55KPE&fs=1&start=" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385" wmode="transparent"></embed></object>

I thought he was quite upbeat on the Euro, for a Yank.

My view on the euro is well known, Europe`s biggest mistake. The video below may be more illuminating;


Quote
Published on 18 Aug 2016

The euro is simply not sustainable and the Eurozone cannot simply look away while its currency sinks the continent, said Joseph Stiglitz, author of 'The Euro'. 'A common currency is threatening the future of Europe,' said Stiglitz. 'Muddling through will not work.' Stiglitz is a professor at Columbia University. He won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences

Go solar, go slow.

selber

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 987
  • -Received: 563
  • Posts: 1586
Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #406 on: January 27, 2017, 02:22 »
@coffejohn
Stiglitz is right . But the euro is a big joint ship , in the middle of the ocean . We can not simply switch to our own ships . We have our own ships sunk . I'm angry at the Euromakers . I often argued with them , was accused as a European enemy . But Europe is being destroyed by Euro .

coffejohn

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 251
  • -Received: 659
  • Posts: 1518
  • Country: 00
  • John Hawkins, retired canal boat builder.
Re: Trump’s EU ambassador hints euro 'could FAIL' in 18 month
« Reply #407 on: January 27, 2017, 12:53 »
What do you think about the comments of Trumps new EU ambassador?

<object width="640" height="385"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/tzM5Ar55KPE&fs=1&start="></param> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param> <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/tzM5Ar55KPE&fs=1&start=" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385" wmode="transparent"></embed></object>

I watch Malloch on BBC`s This Week last night, those with access to BBC IPlayer can view the programme at; http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b08c38fy/this-week-26012017

The most relevant section is at 16.00 minutes in to the programm.

During the program he made it absolutely plain that the Trump administration were anti EU to the bone.

 
Go solar, go slow.

Conti

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 967
  • -Received: 1395
  • Posts: 2042
  • Country: it
The birth of the eurozone
« Reply #408 on: February 02, 2017, 16:35 »


Ex Oriente lux, @selber  :-X
<object width="640" height="385"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Mr9T-943BnE&fs=1&start="></param> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param> <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Mr9T-943BnE&fs=1&start=" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385" wmode="transparent"></embed></object>

selber

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 987
  • -Received: 563
  • Posts: 1586
Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #409 on: February 02, 2017, 22:20 »
@Conti

Thanks for the video . Gysi gave this speech before the euro existed before the crisis. Afterwards we are all smarter, he it was before. In the 90s I was a fan of Gysi because he was the lawyer for the East Germans. Also in this speech. At that time, he was supervised by the Verfassungsschutz  (a sort of secret service), because he was regarded as a threat to the state . It did not harm him in the East , because there was a solidarization effect . Thuringia is not by random  the first country where Die Linke  put the Prime Minister . He spoke of a " Verostdeutschung " of other countries. Translated - other countries will be made to  that what East Germans are . It makes sense . East Germans were often cursed as parasites of the West. Today, others are being cursed

JoseRuiz

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 319
  • -Received: 174
  • Posts: 288
Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #410 on: February 03, 2017, 02:57 »


White House is praying for us. The eurozone will survive, no doubt.

coffejohn

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 251
  • -Received: 659
  • Posts: 1518
  • Country: 00
  • John Hawkins, retired canal boat builder.
Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #411 on: October 03, 2017, 23:33 »
Europe’s Battle on Four Fronts

By; Anatole Kaletsky is Chief Economist and Co-Chairman of Gavekal Dragonomics. A former columnist at the Times of London, the International New York Times and the Financial Times.

From; https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/europe-battle-four-fronts-by-anatole-kaletsky-2017-09

Quote
Frans Timmermans, the European Commission’s first vice president, last year described the state of Europe as “multi-crisis”: Brexit, refugees, “illiberal democracy” in Hungary and Poland, the still-unresolved euro crisis, and the geopolitical risks attributable to Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. All are challenging the “European project” that began 60 years ago with the Treaty of Rome.

But crises invariably create opportunities. And last year’s multi-crisis has produced a convergence of opportunities. European leaders no longer have an excuse for inaction while they wait for voters’ next rebuff.

Quote
Economic reforms in France, German unease about refugees and the euro, new attitudes toward European integration in Brussels, and signs that Brexit will be delayed indefinitely or even completely averted: all have created new possibilities for taming the dangerous forces unleashed by last year’s populist revolts. But realizing these opportunities will require four simultaneous political and economic breakthroughs across Europe.

France must act on over-regulation and excessive public spending. Germany must rethink fiscal austerity and monetary dogma. Britain needs a turnabout on nationalism and immigration. And European Union officials must abandon their obsession with driving all member countries toward an “ever-closer union” that many of their citizens do not want.

Quote
Without simultaneous breakthroughs on all four fronts, it is hard to imagine progress on any of the separate aspects of the multi-crisis. For example, any easing of German-inspired austerity will require evidence of economic reform in France; but French reforms will succeed only if Germany agrees to more generous fiscal rules and supports monetary policies that benefit the eurozone’s weaker members.

Similarly, Brexit could be averted or indefinitely delayed if the EU offered an extension of the negotiating period beyond March 2019 and suggested some modest concessions on immigration and welfare payments. But European leaders would consider offering such concessions only if they saw clear evidence that British voters were changing their minds about leaving the EU.

Read full article at; https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/europe-battle-four-fronts-by-anatole-kaletsky-2017-09

I find Kaletsky overly optimistic on the EU and the UK`s place in it; when he wrote for the Times he was too keen on accepting the status quo for my taste, but this article makes sense to me.
Go solar, go slow.

Lugdu

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1175
  • -Received: 682
  • Posts: 1634
  • Country: fr
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOCucJw7iT8
Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #412 on: October 04, 2017, 12:27 »
Quote
coffejohn : La France doit agir sur la réglementation excessive et les dépenses publiques excessives."
C'est l'ambition de Macron, mais au détriment des citoyens ordinaires et des collectivités locales ! (au lieu des institutions dépensières).
La France est un pays qui ne se réforme pas, mais qui se révolutionne… (dixit moi-même !).

coffejohn

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 251
  • -Received: 659
  • Posts: 1518
  • Country: 00
  • John Hawkins, retired canal boat builder.
Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #413 on: October 04, 2017, 21:10 »
C'est l'ambition de Macron, mais au détriment des citoyens ordinaires et des collectivités locales ! (au lieu des institutions dépensières).
La France est un pays qui ne se réforme pas, mais qui se révolutionne… (dixit moi-même !).


As the saying go`s "reform or revolution".

At the moment we seem to have neither. Instead under the oversight of the EU Commission the EU has entrenchment; not out of desire but fear of opening another, after brexit, Pandora`s box. Germany appears to by caught between two conflicting policies; slow reform of the EU and no reform of the Euro! Meanwhile the rest of the EU is mesmerised in the headlights of an approaching slow car crash driven by immigration and economic divergence.

Applying the above to Kaletsky`s argument it is impossible, to my mind, to see how the EU can acheive "simultaneous breakthroughs on all four fronts" as proposed in his article.

This is why I am coming to the conclusion that the UK will be driven to a hard brexit or a humiliating withdrawal of article 50.
Go solar, go slow.

coffejohn

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 251
  • -Received: 659
  • Posts: 1518
  • Country: 00
  • John Hawkins, retired canal boat builder.
Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #414 on: October 05, 2017, 20:37 »
The Chimera of Franco-German Reform

By; Hans-Helmut Kotz, Program Director of the SAFE Policy Center at the Goethe University in Frankfurt, is a visiting professor of economics and a resident fellow at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University.

From; https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/germany-new-government-eu-reforms-by-hans-helmut-kotz-2017-10



Quote
An abiding truth in the United States is that all politics is local. Apparently, the same wisdom can be applied (to some extent) to the European Union, whose agenda ultimately depends on key member states’ national politic

This is particularly true with respect to eurozone institutions, which almost everyone agrees are in urgent need of reform. Indeed, shoring up the eurozone was the common thread in major speeches by European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and French President Emmanuel Macron last month.

In his State of the Union address, Juncker boldly outlined his ambitious vision for Europe’s future. He called on the EU to complete its banking union, establish a European finance ministry (fully integrated into the Commission), and expand the EU-level budget.

Macron, in a speech at the Sorbonne, touched on issues ranging from defense and security to eurozone reform and Europe’s political divides. But he left much unsaid. And, in line with his role as a national leader, his was an inter-governmental, not a community perspective.

Quote
The fate of any EU agenda – whether Juncker’s or Macron’s – rests with Merkel, who is unlikely to make any significant political moves. Indeed, bold action of the type Juncker and Macron have proposed would not just be uncharacteristic for Merkel; it would also require her to invest all of her remaining political capital.


Quote
Sorting out these questions will require a level of political entrepreneurship unlike anything Merkel has ever shown. To join in Macron’s European project, she would have to assume an entirely new role and expose herself to substantial political risks. Germany would have to take the initiative: rather than rejecting proposals, it would have to offer its own.

Such behavior can hardly be expected from a government that, beholden to the median German voter, plays it safe. The German political center has been shifting, and it is heading in a different direction than Juncker and Macron. As a result, the eurozone’s institutional design will likely remain incomplete.

Full article at; https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/germany-new-government-eu-reforms-by-hans-helmut-kotz-2017-10
Go solar, go slow.