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In the beginning of 2015 Lithuania will become the 19th member of the eurozone. How do you expect the number of eurozone members to develop in the following 10 years until the year 2025?

There will be more than 19 eurozone member states in 2025.
23 (79.3%)
There will still be 19 eurozone member states.
1 (3.4%)
There will be less than 19 eurozone member states in 10 years.
1 (3.4%)
The euro won't exist any more.
4 (13.8%)

Total Members Voted: 15

Voting closed: December 24, 2014, 16:36

Author Topic: The future of the eurozone  (Read 69354 times)

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selber

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Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #450 on: February 05, 2018, 11:44 »
et en plus, parfois les pays d'origine nous rappellent des passages de notre histoire sociale, politique, économique, que nous voudrions bien ne pas revivre !
Africa has increased its population fivefold in 50 years and will do it again. The continent will grow rapidly to 4 billion people. These people will live in abject poverty and Europe will not be able to absorb the refugees without becoming Africa. The future will remind you better on the bad times than imagination could .

coffejohn

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  • John Hawkins, retired canal boat builder.
Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #451 on: February 09, 2018, 12:05 »

NATO's, and the EU`s, Real Existential Threat: The Surrender Of Western Values

From; http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/natos-real-existential-threat-the-surrender-of-western-values/

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The alliance's elites have come down with a case of civilizational cluelessness.
By William S. Smith • February 7, 2018

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On January 17, Petr Pavel, a Czech army general and NATO’s military committee chairman, led meetings with his counterparts from Ukraine and Georgia, which he tweeted were “Sessions dedicated to Projecting Stability.” Yet while NATO’s collaboration with nations historically intertwined with Russia could lead to a number of possible outcomes, “stability” seems the least likely one. Like so much of what the alliance does, the purpose of these meetings is to push the alliance ever eastward.

That raises a question. Why should Americans participate in an alliance in which a general—from a minuscule military power that spends 1 percent of its GDP on defense—hosts a meeting that is more likely to provoke a catastrophic U.S.-Russia war than to prevent one? As Ted Galen Carpenter recently explained here at TAC, this is the dangerous calculus that results from interlocking the United States with so many NATO nations, including some that Moscow regards as within its sphere of influence. 

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But nothing highlights the civilizational cluelessness of Western elites quite like the deliberate facilitation of mass Islamic migration into Europe. When a leader such as Angela Merkel defends Islamic migration on economic and multicultural grounds, she shows herself to be simply ignorant about what made Western civilization distinctive and successful and what is now threatening it. The embers of our heritage will ultimately burn out in nations like Germany, where domestic politics will trend toward ambivalence about NATO. A demographic profile with large blocs of Muslim voters will transform the geopolitical views of the political classes in a number of Western countries. (The political implications of Islamic migration for Europe are presaged in Michel Houellebecq’s controversial novel Submission.) Some Western nations, it seems obvious, will no longer support a Western alliance because they will no longer be Western. One can envision a time when certain Eastern European countries, which still cherish their heritage, will be the only reliable alliance partners. NATO, famous for scenario planning, ought to plan for that, rather than covetously eyeing Vladimir Putin’s neighbors.


Given the recent shift to the left of Germany under the EU`s henchman Schulz and the simultaneous move to the right in the UK and USA I wonder if the allegiance to NATO and the EU by non EU nations will stand firm in the face of Russian manipulation of media and facts?
Go solar, go slow.

selber

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Re: The future of the eurozone
« Reply #452 on: February 10, 2018, 11:03 »
@coffejohn
I think that Mr. Smith makes the right concerns. But are they the worry of America? Ukraine was seen by the Russians as its sphere of influence already 10 years ago. America claims to have invested $ 10 billion in the "development" of Ukrainian democracy. The CIA was involved in the Maidan coup. Today, the Americans want to upgrade Ukraine with American weapons. I think the meeting of the generals fits into the American concept. Whatever goal this pursues. For this reasoning, I do not need "manipulated facts". Although there are hardly any facts that are not manipulated. In the world, in the EU, and in the Eurozone, a propaganda war has been raging for years.