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Author Topic: My YouTube choices.  (Read 192 times)

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coffejohn

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My YouTube choices.
« on: November 03, 2017, 23:26 »



Eivør - Trøllabundin

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Lugdu

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Eivør Pálsdóttir
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2017, 13:11 »
intéressant
et visiblement, elle a des amateurs francophones, car j'ai trouvé une page de wikipédia à son nom + pseudonyme en français !

in english < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eiv%C3%B8r_P%C3%A1lsd%C3%B3ttir >

coffejohn

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Re: My YouTube choices.
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2017, 22:25 »


Quote
Færøyiske Eivør Pálsdóttir framfører sin egen sang «Tròdlabùndin» (fra albumet «Trøllabundin» 2005) på en utekonsert med Vamp på fjellgården Stigen i Aurland, 10.08.13. Stigen gård er på UNESCOs verdensarvliste fra 2005, og den ligger ved Aurlandsfjorden. NRK 18.07.15 / 31.12.13 Eivør Pálsdóttir on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eivormusic/

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coffejohn

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Re: My YouTube choices.
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2017, 00:09 »



Historical film footage of life on Working British Canal Boats during the mid-20th century
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Lugdu

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re: mariniers.
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2017, 21:05 »
Je remarque que c'est le marinier qui manœuvre l'écluse dans la 1°partie. Il me semble qu'en France, c'était les éclusiers qui œuvraient. Il y en avait 2 par écluse (un couple en général) je crois, pour travailler sur une grande amplitude horaire chaque jour.
Je remarque aussi que le marinier a un veston : est-ce pour la caméra et le film ? Ici les mariniers travaillaient en chandail, le veston c'était pour sortir…
Ensuite je n'ai pas compris ce qui se dit pour le chargement.
 
À Lyon, de nos jours, nous avons encore quelques mariniers qui circulent, mais très peu, les camions font tout le travail de transport malheureusement.
Il y a 2 écluses dans l'agglomération : une au nord qui vient d'être rénovée et est automatique  sur la Saône (trafic touristique) ; l'autre au sud, plus industrielle sur le Rhône. 
Il y en a 2 sur le Rhône amont, (ou 3) mais elles en fonctionnent plus. Officiellement la mairie de la commune ne sait pas à qui elles appartiennent (histoire de ne pas payer leur rénovation) : conclusion, on ne circule plus sur le Rhône lyonnais !

coffejohn

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Re: My YouTube choices.
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2017, 21:37 »
On the English canal system it was the boatmen/women/children who worked the locks with the exception of some larger locks. Uniforms were not generally issued although later some canal companies may have issued working clothes.

Working boats have all but ceased to exist on the English narrow canal system, a few still work on the river system and wider canals in the north. Today the canals are run by a Trust modeled on the National trust with the aim of preserving the canal system as a leisure resource.

This video may show more detailed information;


Inland Waterways 1950 Beulah Library Roll F21


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coffejohn

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Re: My YouTube choices.
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2017, 14:02 »



ICEBREAKING ON THE CANALS PAST AND PRESENT

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coffejohn

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Re: My YouTube choices.
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2017, 16:10 »


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coffejohn

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Re: My YouTube choices.
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2017, 16:58 »

Starting the 15 HP Hot bulb hit and miss Bolinder in the Narrowboat Spey.



From; http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel/marine/bolinder.htm

Quote
Bolinder started with oil engines in about 1894, manufacturing four-stroke engines, but the change was made to two-stroke operation early on, and thereafter was to be almost exclusively used by the company. The early model 'E' engines used water injection or drip at high powers, to prevent overheating of the bulb in the cylinder head.

By 1918, over 600,000 bhp had been sold in various engine types and configurations, making Bolinder one of the leading engine makers in Europe, although its location in Sweden restricted its export potential. The production sizes were: 5hp to 80hp in single cylinder, 10hp to 160hp in twins, and 80hp to 320hp in four-cylinder engines. This large range was later restricted to only up to 80hp in the twin cylinder versions, the larger fours being discontinued as the main market for Bolinder was in fishing vessels etc. Higher powers were catered for by the later ranges of 'M' engines.

Interestingly, the governor on the 'E' engine was the 'hit and miss' type, rather than continuous fuel flow control, the engines also being almost unique for a period for not having a reverse gearbox, the engine being directly reversible. Air starting was utilised for most of the Bolinder range of engines, a single or twin compressor being built into the engine for this purpose.

The later engines, designated the 'M' series were of improved design, with blower scavenging and water cooling of the cylinder heads to prevent overheating of the hot bulb at high powers. In normal use, the hot bulb was subjected to a wide range of temperatures, which caused a lot of thermal cracking and distortion. Water cooling made the range of temperatures narrower, with increased reliability.

The use of a blower (compressor) for scavenging was becoming quite widespread, and the Bolinder engine could run at reduced power with the blower out of action, which was useful for marine users who could otherwise have their ship become disabled far from land and repair facilities.

Sizes of typical engine: 500bhp engine weighed 40 tons, ran at 160 rpm, length including thrust block and clutch 27ft, flywheel diameter 4ft 7in diameter (1.40 metres) and the first boat to be fitted with this engine was the "Hjalmar Sorensen", length 165 ft breadth 33 ft draught 12 ft 9 ins deadweight cargo 750 tons, built in Denmark out of steel in 1915 and rigged as a four-masted schooner. The 'M' engine fitted to this vessel was a 240 bhp model and the ship made her first voyage to South America in May 1915.




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coffejohn

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Re: My YouTube choices.
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2017, 17:27 »


Harecastle Tunnel. Time lapse journey. 40 minute trip condensed to just over 6 minutes

From; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harecastle_Tunnel

Quote
Harecastle Tunnel is a canal tunnel on the Trent and Mersey Canal in Staffordshire between Kidsgrove and Tunstall. It comprises two separate and parallel tunnels described as "Brindley" and the later "Telford" after the engineers who constructed them. The tunnel was built to transport coal to heat the kilns in the Staffordshire Potteries. At 1.5 miles (2.4 km) it was once one of the longest canal tunnels in Britain.

Today only the Telford tunnel is navigable. The tunnel is only wide enough to carry traffic in one direction at a time and boats are sent through in groups, alternating northbound and southbound. Ventilation is handled by large fans at the south portal.



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coffejohn

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Re: My YouTube choices.
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2017, 13:15 »


Tug 'Caggy' - A Foggy Morning through Tipton

Alan ‘Caggy’ Stevens proud boatman who kept tradition alive on the BCN. (Photo credit: Geoff Bennet)
BCN ; Birmingham canal navigation.


We built our last boat at Caggy`s Tipton boatyard. The link below gives an idea of his yard then and now; Caggy died some years ago but the yard continues under new management.

https://inlanding.wordpress.com/2013/03/11/bcn-tugs-series-caggy/



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coffejohn

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Re: My YouTube choices.
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2017, 20:08 »


Wooden Narrowboat Building - Steaming planks - Spey Docking

Quote
mykaskin
Published on 22 Oct 2014
During the 2014 docking of Spey, two planks were set to be replaced. This film shows the process of test fitting and final adjustments, creation of a new scarf joint, steaming, bending, and temporary fixing of the plank in place.


The construction of the plank steamer unit will amuse some.

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