calimero
Hello Guest! Please sign in or register!

  • Interesting maps of Europe 5 3
Currently:  

Author Topic: Interesting maps of Europe  (Read 84360 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Lugdu

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1199
  • -Received: 722
  • Posts: 1744
  • Country: fr
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOCucJw7iT8
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #375 on: September 26, 2015, 16:07 »
What about the famous French cuisine ?
if you note what the french people really eat, every day or every sunday, you'll be really disappointed about "the famous cuisine" !  ;)
« Last Edit: September 26, 2015, 16:12 by Lugdu »

Julius

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 4
  • -Received: 71
  • Posts: 100
  • Country: 00
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #376 on: September 27, 2015, 02:31 »
Why?

Julius

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 4
  • -Received: 71
  • Posts: 100
  • Country: 00
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #377 on: September 27, 2015, 02:52 »
You're right @selber , the map is not really correct. I think according to the actual Italian prejudice the circles centered in Italy should be replaced with ellypses including the rest of Latin Europe in the "real food"/"mostly safe to eat" area.  :P

You right! ;D
Every country has their specialties that are very good and other that need a local "training" before to appreciate it...
If we take sweden the gravlax or pyttipanna are very good but for the the surströmming or worst the iceland's hákarl you need to be a local to simply...smell it.
Like many italian I'm not very open to foreign interpretation of traditional dishes and I have strong prejudice of eating italian outside Italy and it is something I try to avoid. If I am abroad I really want to eat local food for me is it a big part of your trip...learning culture with your mouth is a fun part of the process.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2015, 03:18 by Julius »

selber

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1058
  • -Received: 589
  • Posts: 1679
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #378 on: September 27, 2015, 10:08 »
@Julius

How about this ? Dumplings with  roulade and cabbage . Local cuisine off Thuringia ! :-X

BD75

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 92
  • -Received: 286
  • Posts: 509
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #379 on: September 27, 2015, 16:01 »
How about this ? Dumplings with  roulade and cabbage . Local cuisine off Thuringia ! :-X

Looks familiar. Local cuisine of Upper Silesia:

Julius

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 4
  • -Received: 71
  • Posts: 100
  • Country: 00
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #380 on: September 27, 2015, 20:26 »
@Julius
How about this ? Dumplings with  roulade and cabbage . Local cuisine off Thuringia ! :-X

I'll definitely give a try, It looks good.

Julius

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 4
  • -Received: 71
  • Posts: 100
  • Country: 00
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #381 on: September 28, 2015, 17:56 »
Euroscepticism in Europe


socrates

  • Administrator
  • Super-Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1774
  • -Received: 896
  • Posts: 1162
  • Country: es
Interesting maps of Europe - Income per region in Roman times
« Reply #382 on: November 05, 2015, 21:24 »
Income per region in Roman times…


Lugdu

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1199
  • -Received: 722
  • Posts: 1744
  • Country: fr
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOCucJw7iT8
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #383 on: November 06, 2015, 00:00 »
and how do people calculate this ?

socrates

  • Administrator
  • Super-Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1774
  • -Received: 896
  • Posts: 1162
  • Country: es
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #384 on: November 06, 2015, 20:20 »
and how do people calculate this ?

Quote
You may also be wondering how on earth you calculate and compare GDP per capita figures from 2,000 years ago? The numbers for the map come from historian Angus Maddison who uses Sestertius records to find wheat equivalent figure for national disposable income and makes comparisons based off that.

It also assumes the population of the Empire in 14AD was 44 million (other estimates have it as high as 60 million), so is at best just a very educated guess. The Roman Economy Wikipedia page has more on this.

http://brilliantmaps.com/roman-empire-gdp/


Primavera

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 284
  • -Received: 203
  • Posts: 288
  • Country: 00
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #385 on: November 18, 2015, 17:58 »
Portuguese emigration 2001-2014



Portugal is the EU country with the most emigrants in proportion to is population. Two million portuguese (20%) have moved abroad. Lately, more to the UK, Switzerland and France.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2015, 18:20 by prima vera »

Lugdu

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1199
  • -Received: 722
  • Posts: 1744
  • Country: fr
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOCucJw7iT8
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #386 on: November 19, 2015, 20:22 »
une longue tradition…

Primavera

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 284
  • -Received: 203
  • Posts: 288
  • Country: 00
Re: Interesting maps of Europe
« Reply #387 on: December 04, 2015, 20:01 »

Frank Zappa

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 801
  • -Received: 960
  • Posts: 1688
  • Country: 00
Average wealth per adult in Europe
« Reply #388 on: March 09, 2017, 17:41 »


Why are the Italians not paying fiscal transfers to Northern eurozone countries?  :-X

"Government is the Entertainment division of the military-industrial complex."

Conti

  • Super-Hero Member
  • ******
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 986
  • -Received: 1415
  • Posts: 2068
  • Country: it
Re: Average wealth per adult in Europe
« Reply #389 on: March 09, 2017, 18:16 »


Why are the Italians not paying fiscal transfers to Northern eurozone countries?  :-X

Quote
Credit Suisse recently published a study comparing the wealth (net worth) of average adults (as private individuals, i.e. not the wealth of the whole country divided by its population) in different countries.

Maybe this article by Paul De Grauwe can help: Are Germans really poorer than Spaniards, Italians and Greeks?

Quote
There does seem to be a problem of the distribution of wealth in Germany:

First, wealth in Germany is highly concentrated in the upper part of the household-income distribution.
Second, a large part of German wealth is not held by households and therefore must be held by the corporate sector or the government.
Thus while it is may not be reasonable to ask the ‘poor’ median German household to transfer resources to southern European countries, it may be more reasonable to make such demands on the richer part of the German households and the corporate sector. Put differently, the opposition in Germany to making transfers to the south finds its origin not in the low wealth of the country. The facts are that Germany is one of the wealthiest countries of the Eurozone. The problem is that this wealth is very unequally distributed in Germany, creating a perception among less wealthy Germans that these transfers are unfair.